Outlines For Narrative Essays

The very first thing you think of when someone mentions essay is that you have to make an argument, find evidence, and write it in a somewhat philosophical manner. But, it doesn’t always have to be like that. Did you know you can tell a story through essay? I’m talking about narrative essays, a unique style of writing that combines the best of both worlds: storytelling and essay composing. The chances are high you’ll have to compose this type of paper sooner or later, and when the time comes this post will come handy. Throughout this article, I’m going to show you how to create an outline for a narrative essay and make your professor or client happy with the quality of your work.

What is a narrative essay?

A narrative essay is defined as a type of writing wherein the author narrates or tells the story. The story is non-fictional and usually, deals with the writer’s personal development. Unlike in other essay forms, using the first person is acceptable in these papers. Narrative essays can also be anecdotal, experiential thus allowing writers to express themselves in a creative and more personal manner.

Despite the fact you’re telling the story through the narrative essay, you must not identify it with a short story. How? Short stories are usually fictional and allow essay writers to change the plot, add different characters or rewrite the ending in a bid to better fit the narrative. On the other hand, with these essays, the author is required to pull a cohesive narrative arc from memory and events that, actually, happened. Just like other forms of essays, this style of writing needs a thesis statement. In fact, the entire narrative in your essay aims to support the thesis you wrote in the introduction. As you already know, short stories don’t require thesis statement and you’re not required to prove anything.

Narrative essay structure

If you’ve never written a narrative essay before and you need help essay online at this moment you’re thinking how complicated it seems. The beauty of this writing style is the ability to get your point across through a story and it’s not that difficult when you know how to structure it correctly.

Just like with other types of essays, a functional outline is essential. That way you know what to include in different parts of the paper and everything it entails. I have created diagram below to help you out. 

Introduction

An intro isn’t just a small paragraph that you have to write in order to get to the “real stuff”. If an entrance of some amusement park isn’t interesting, you’d feel reluctant to go in. If the first chapter of the book is boring, you’re less likely to ditch it. Essays aren’t exceptions here, the beginning or starting point is essential. Introductions attract reader’s attention, makes him/her wonder about what you’re going to write next.

The introduction of the narrative essay is written either in the first or third person. It’s recommended to start off your work with a hook including some strong statement or a quote. The sole purpose of the hook is to immediately intrigue your professor, client, audience, and so on. As seen in the diagram above, after the hook you have to write a sentence or two about the importance of the topic to both you and the reader. Basically, this part has to be written in a manner that readers of the paper can relate to. You want them to think “I feel that way”, “I’ve been through that” etc.

The last sentence (or two) of your paper account for the thesis statement, the vital part of your essay. The reason is simple, the thesis informs readers about the direction you’re going to take. It allows the audience to tune into author’s mind. Since the primary purpose of every essay is to prove some point and your story is going to be told for a reason, the thesis cements your overall attitude and approach throughout the paper.

The introduction should be:

  • Short
  • Precise
  • Interesting
  • Relatable

Body paragraphs

Now that your introduction is complete, you get to proceed to write body paragraphs. This is where all the magic happens, it’s the part wherein you start, develop, and end the narration. The number of paragraphs in this section depends on the type of narration or event you want to write about and the plot itself.

This segment starts with the setting or background of the event to allow readers to understand relevant details and other necessary info. Every great story starts with the background, a part where you introduce the reader to the subject. Make sure you enter precise details because that way the readers are more involved in the story.

Besides important details about the subject and event you’re going to describe through the narrative essay, it’s highly practical to introduce characters or people that are involved in some particular situation. Describe their physical and personality characteristics. However, ensure that characteristics you include are relevant to the essay itself. This is yet another point where narrative essay differs from the short story. When writing a short story, you get to include all sorts of personality traits to develop your character. Here, you only mention those that are important for your thesis and narrative. Instead of listing characters one after another, introduce them through the story. The best way to do so depends on the type of the subject or event you’re going to write about, different kinds of topic require a different approach. Regardless of the approach, you opt for to introduce characters, always stick to the “relevant characteristics” rule.

Short anecdote or foreshadowing, basically, refers to details establishing conflict or the stakes for people regarding some specific situation. This part is a sort of precursor to the onset of the event. Use these paragraphs to explain:

  • How things started to happen
  • What people involved (characters) did to reach the point where the event of your story was imminent i.e. point of no return
  • Detailed description of the situation
  • How you felt about everything

TIP: Bear in mind that this doesn’t, necessarily, have to refer to some unfortunate event with tragic consequences. You can use the same approach to writing about other kinds of situations that lead to a more optimistic outcome.

Logically, the event has to reach its climax, a breaking point of the story, which requires detailed description. Don’t forget to include emotions, how it made you (or someone else) feel. The climax should be accurate, don’t exaggerate and stray from the truth just to make it more interesting. Instead, make this part more vivid, include powerful words and adjectives to make readers feel the tension and emotions you experienced.

After every climax, there comes the resolution good or bad. This is the part where you write how everything resolved. Without this segment, the narrative would seem incomplete and your hard work would be ruined.

So, body paragraphs should contain the following qualities:

  • Detailed descriptions
  • Relevant details
  • Accurate information
  • Powerful adjectives to truly depict the situation
  • Interesting
  • Emotions

Conclusion

You finished the narrative and before you’re done with the writing part of the essay, it’s time to conclude it. Just like the intro, this paragraph also bears a major importance. The conclusion should provide moral of the story, reflection or analysis of the significance of the event to you and the reader. This is yet another opportunity to make readers relate to your paper. Use this segment to describe what lesson you learned, how did this event affect/change your life, and so on. Depending on the subject, you could also include call-to-action to raise awareness of some growing issue in the society.

Dos and don’ts

  • DO start your essay with a question, fact, definition, quote, anything that you deem interesting, relevant, and catchy at the same time
  • DON’T focus only on the sense of sight when writing narrative essay, use all five senses, add details about what you heard or felt
  • DO use formal language
  • DO use vivid details
  • DO use dialogue if necessary
  • DON’T use the same structure of sentences, vary them to make the writing more interesting
  • DO describe events chronologically (it’s the easiest way to tell the story)
  • DO use transition words to make it clear what happened first, next, and last

Tips to remember

  • The goal of narrative essay is to make a point, the event or story you’re going to tell needs some purpose
  • Use clear and concise language
  • Every word or detail you write needs to contribute to the overall meaning of the narrative
  • Record yourself talking about the event to easily organize different details
  • Don’t complicate the story; imagine you’re writing the narrative for a child. Would he/she understand the narrative? That always helps to simplify text
  • Revise, modify, edit, and proofread

Bottom line

Narrative essays help you get some point across through storytelling, but you shouldn’t mistake them for “regular” short stories. I explained how to structure your work, differentiate it from short stories, and how you can easily develop your narration. Following the outline will help you write a high-quality essay and diagram from this article can serve as a visual clue you can use to compose your work. Start practicing today and write a narrative essay about some major event in your life. You can do it! 

Image courtesy of Amra Serdarevich

In most cases, a writer gets ideas for the essay story out of nowhere. However, even the highest inspiration at its performance peak will simply not work without a narrative essay outline. Every student should write a story outline. A narrative essay outline has basic rules tutorial. In order to create an effective narrative essay the writer should adhere to them.

Thesis Statement

The outline of the narrative essay has a thesis statement with the clear conflict and up front.

“I studied Spanish hard and now I’m fluent at speaking Spanish”.

Professional essay writer should start working on the essay with a topic sentence. For example, “My inability to speak Spanish fluently was a major burden for me in the class”. As there are many ways for the writer to begin the narrative story writing, the outline is written ensuring the chronological set of events.

Essay Outline Details

An essay outline can also be called the narrative arc. It should begin with the exposition, describing the time and place  in the essay introduction. Also, it should introduce the main essay or story characters ‘Setting: Stockton, Calif. St.Endrew High School, early September 2012. Characters: John Olafson, protagonist, recently arrived from Bakersfield, Calif. Character’s main features: tall, red hair, blue eyes.” Keep in mind, that the essay outline is primarily just notes for the author, the outline should not flow as the essay itself.

  1. After the essay characters and setting exposition is clearly stated, the writer should fill in the unknown areas of the protagonist life with the conflict, difficult situation, antagonists and actions. “The main conflict described in the essay is John’s inability to speak Spanish though he knows all the grammar rules and his vocabulary is rich”.
  2. The outline may say. “In addition, he gets constant heckling from a class bully, Ben Waldo.”
  3. The outline has a goal to show the conflict itself, but the main antagonist who participate in it too.
  4. The rising action should give details to the complications that appear from the conflict. “John has a dream to invite his Spanish-speaking friend Jane out, but he cannot do this as he can get no word out.” “Jane goes on a date with Ben.”

Essay Conclusion Outline

  • The End of the essay is extremely important. The climax should be a turning point. It doesn’t matter how much writing you use to describe it. When the conflict is resolved, the writer may proceed to the outline finishing. “Jane realizes that John is special and sees him in a new way.”
  • The narrative essay may also have an unhappy ending. “Jane confesses to John that she is going to marry Ben.”
  • It doesn’t matter what ending will you choose, the pattern exposition-rising action- climax-resolving should be used in all conditions. This is the best pattern for all narrative stories.

Did you Know we can Write your Essay for You? 

Essay Outline Structure

Below you can find the example of the real outline of the 5 paragraph essay on the topic “Decisions we take in our life”.

Introduction

Thesis statement: During the life, a person should encounter many decisions, but the decisions made in childhood were the toughest.

Body Paragraph 1

Topic Sentence: Brooklyn is the place where I opened my eyes to the worlds for the first time.

Detail 1: Family information.

Example: I grew up with my father, living with his side of the family.

Detail 2: Where I had experienced my first life challenges.

Example: I had to walk to school alone.

Example: Playing on the streets in summer.

Body Paragraph 2

Topic Sentence: Being born and raised in Brooklyn and leaving it all.

Detail 1: It is hard to separate from the people I grew up with.

Example:  Most of my life I spent with my grandmother.

Example:  I used to go out with my close friends and cousins.

Detail 2: I was afraid to leave my surroundings.

Example: Description of my neighborhood.

Example: Description of my family.

Detail 3: Reluctance to erase the dreams and goals I had.

To become a successful person in the hometown.

Body Paragraph 3

Topic Sentence: The turning point of my whole life.

Detail 1: how to leave everything you know out of surprise.

Example: Not enough time to see everyone before leaving.

Detail 2: Necessity to restart the life.

Example: New people.

Example: New places.

Detail 3: Getting use to people completely opposite than you.

Example: College hostel.

Example: Real student’s life during the first university year.

Conclusion

After all the experience got since the childhood, I became more independent and learned how to make my own decisions, without being subjected to the influence of the other people.

0 thoughts on “Outlines For Narrative Essays

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *